Bartiromo Celebrates 25th Anniversary As First NYSE Floor Reporter

Bartiromo Celebrates 25th Anniversary As First NYSE Floor Reporter

Bartiromo celebrated the 25th anniversary of being the first person to broadcast from the Stock Exchange floor Tuesday by virtually ringing the opening bell

Tuesday marked the 25th anniversary of Maria Bartiromo becoming the first reporter to broadcast from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange and Fox News and Fox Business Network carried her virtual NYSE bell-ringing in simulcast.

She explained, at the time, there were “a handful of people who didn’t want me there, but the truth is, is the majority of people were so supportive and so wonderful to me.”

Bartiromo, who worked for CNBC at the time, explained to her Fox News colleagues that there is “so much camaraderie on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange” — which made it hard for her to break in. They became “like family,” in the end, she told Sandra Smith.

“I’ll never forget when I was getting married in 1999, unbeknownst to me, they put a ball and chains on my ankle. That told me I was part of the family. What they do is a tradition: They dump a bucket of water on the person when you’re getting married and then they put the ball and chains on your ankle. They spared me the bucket of water,” said the “Mornings With Maria” host.

“The guys on the floor and the gals have been really lifelong friends,” she added. “I adore them and I’m so grateful for all that they’ve done for me to help me get used to being on the floor, because it’s a special place, it really is.”

Fox Business hosts Stuart Varney and Dagen McDowell joined in the virtual celebration, calling Bartiromo “a star.” McDowell pointed out that Bartiromo has spoken out about the “boys’ club” and harassment she faced to get the job done, then added, “Women across the country could watch you, young girls could watch you. I was just starting off as a financial journalist and you gave me inspiration and a roadmap of how to do my job.”

Celebrities Who Have Died From the Coronavirus (Photos)

  • The world continues to be upended by the coronavirus pandemic, with more people contracting COVID-19 as the days pass. While many have recovered, some have died from complications of the illness. These are the names of some notable figures from Hollywood and the media  that we have lost.

  • Terrence McNally, a four-time Tony Award-winning playwright, died on March 24 at the age of 81 of complications from the coronavirus. His works included “Master Class,” “Love! Valour! Compassion!” and “Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune,” which later became a film with Michelle Pfeiffer and Al Pacino.

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  • Italian actress Lucia Bosè, who starred in such films as Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Story of a Love Affair” (1950) and Juan Antonio Bardem’s “Death of a Cyclist” (1955), died on March 23 of pneumonia after contracting COVID-19, according to the Guardian. She was 89.

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  • Chef Floyd Cardoz, winner of “Top Chef Masters” Season 3, died at the age of 59 of coronavirus complications on March 25.

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  • Mark Blum, who starred in “Desperately Seeking Susan,” “Crocodile Dundee” and the Lifetime/Netflix series “You,” died on March 26 of coronavirus complications. The veteran character actor and regular on New York City stages was 69.

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  • Maria Mercader, a CBS News veteran who worked for over 30 years as a reporter and talent director, died March 29 after testing positive for coronavirus. She was 54.

    CBS News

  • Grammy-winning country music singer Joe Diffie died March 29 due to complications from the coronavirus. He announced his diagnosis just two days prior.

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  • American rock musician Alan Merrill, best known for co-writing and recording the original version of “I Love Rock ‘n’ Roll,” died March 29 of complications from the coronavirus. He was 69.

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  • Popular Japanese comedian Ken Shimura, whose career spanned decades, died March 29 due to complications from the coronavirus. He was 70.

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  • Andrew Jack, a dialect coach who most recently was hired to work with Robert Pattinson on the new Batman movie, died March 31 of complications from coronavirus, TMZ reports. He also appeared in “Star Wars: Episode VII” as a member of Leia’s resistance. Jack was 76.

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  • Adam Schlesinger, Fountains of Wayne singer and “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend” contribute, died at the age of 52 from coronavirus complications on April 1.

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  • Ellis Marsalis Jr., New Orleans jazz legend and father of Wynton and Branford Marsalis, died at 85 from COVID-19 complications, Branford said. “Ellis Marsalis was a legend. He was the prototype of what we mean when we talk about New Orleans jazz… He was a teacher, a father, and an icon — and words aren’t sufficient to describe the art, the joy and the wonder he showed the world,” New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell said also.

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  • Eddie Large, one-half of the comedy duo Little and Large, died April 2 after contracting coronavirus while hospitalized for heart failure. He was 78.

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  • Sergio Rossi, the Italian shoe designer, died at age 84 after being hospitalized with the virus, the brand confirmed in an Instagram post Friday.

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  • Patricia Bosworth, a stage and screen actress turned journalist who penned celebrity biographies, died April 2 from complications of the coronavirus. She was 86.

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  • Tom Dempsey, New Orleans Saints legendary kicker who was born without toes on his right foot and wore a flat shoe that he kicked with, died on April 4 from complications of COVID-19.

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  • John Prine, one of the most influential and revered folk and country songwriters of the last 50 years, died on April 6 at the age of 73 after being infected with the COVID-19 virus.

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  • Allen Garfield,  who appeared in such films as “The Conversation,” “Nashville” and “Irreconcilable Differences,” died April 7 due to coronavirus complications, according to his sister. He was 80.

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  • Charles Gregory, an Emmy-nominated hairstylist who frequently collaborated with Tyler Perry on his films and TV shows, died of complications from COVID-19 on April 8.

    Charles Gregory/YouTube

  • Hilary Heath, an actress and producer who starred opposite Vincent Price in horror movies in the late 1960s and early ’70s, died in April of COVID-19 complications. She was 74.

    American International Pictures

  • Rick May, a voice actor best known to gamers as the husky-throated Soldier in Team Fortress 2, died in Swedish nursing home on April 13 after contracting COVID-19. He was 79.

    Linkedin/Valve

  • Allen Daviau, a 5-time Oscar-nominated cinematographer, died April 15 at age 77. He frequently collaborated with Steven Spielberg, and worked on such films as “E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial” and “The Color Purple”

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  • Henry Grimes, celebrated jazz bassist, died on April 15 at age 84, according to WGBO. He worked with such legends as Thelonius Monk, Charles Mingus and Sonny Rollins.

  • “Knight Rider” and “Magnum P.I.” producer Joel Rogosin died of coronavirus at the MPTF nursing home. He became the fifth person to die from COVID-19 complications at the facility.

    MPTF

  • Rapper Fred the Godson died after contracting coronavirus, a representative confirmed to Complex. He wrote on social media of his diagnosis on April 6, but he did not recover.

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  • Art director Matteo De Cosmo, who worked on films including “Emergence,” “The Punisher” and “Luke Cage,” died of coronavirus complications. He was 52.

    Victoria Dearing

  • Roy Horn, best known as half of the legendary Siegfried & Roy magic and animal act in Las Vegas, died on May 8 from complications due to coronavirus.

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  • Legendary Auburn football coach Pat Dye died on June 1 after combating COVID-19 and other medical conditions. He was 80.

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  • Chris Trousdale, a member of the boy band Dream Street, died of coronavirus complications on June 2. He was 34.

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  • Broadway star Nick Cordero passed away on July 5 due to complications from coronavirus. He was 41. 

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  • Herman Cain, the former CEO of Godfather’s Pizza who sought the Republican nomination for president in 2012, died July 30 from complications of the coronavirus. He was 74. He was hospitalized in Atlanta just days after attending a campaign rally for Donald Trump in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where he was seen without a mask.

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While many celebrities who contracted COVID-19 have recovered, some have died from complications of the illness

The world continues to be upended by the coronavirus pandemic, with more people contracting COVID-19 as the days pass. While many have recovered, some have died from complications of the illness. These are the names of some notable figures from Hollywood and the media  that we have lost.

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