William and Kate are spotted outside Heathrow Airport with children

William and Kate are spotted outside Heathrow Airport with children

Keep calm and carry on! Wills and Kate are spotted at Heathrow with George, Charlotte and Louis in tow after Queen health scare

  •  Prince William and Kate Middleton carried on as normal this week as the Queen was admitted to hospital  
  • Royal couple were spotted outside Heathrow airport’s Windsor Suite which costs £3,300 for three hours
  • Always one to travel in style, Kate sported a £295 Diamond Geo Maxi Shirt Dress from British brand Me + Em 

Prince William appeared to put his grandmother’s health scare behind him and carried on as normal this week as he was spotted outside the Windsor Suite at Heathrow airport along with his wife the Duchess of Cambridge and their three children.

William and  Kate, both 39, appeared to travel from the airport with Prince George, eight, Princess Charlotte, six, and Prince Louis, three, from  their Kensington Palace home in London.

The royals were driven to the airport by Prince William in a blacked out Audi closely escorted by security and a nanny.

The exclusive lounge is located inside Heathrow’s Terminal 5 and is reserved for the Royal Family and other high profile celebrities – with one three hour stay costing £3,300. It’s not clear where the family where travelling.

The trip comes as the Queen, 95, was admitted to King Edward VII’s on Wednesday afternoon and stayed there overnight for tests, having to cancel a trip to Northern Ireland last minute.

Prince William has been spotted outside the Windsor Suite at Heathrow along with his wife the Duchess of Cambridge and their three children

William and Kate, both 39, appeared to travel from the airport with their three children George, eight Princess Charlotte, six, and Prince Louis, three, from their Kensington Palace home in central London

The exclusive lounge is located inside Heathrow’s Terminal 5 and is reserved for the Royal Family and other high profile celebrities – with one three hour stay costing £3,300. It’s not clear where the family where travelling

In the photos, taken on Thursday afternoon,  the royal parents can be seen unloading the car whilst Prince George waits patiently on the kerb.

Always one to travel in style, Kate sported a £295 Diamond Geo Maxi Shirt Dress  from British brand Me + Em.

Proving her style chops she added a matching mask as she a carried a straw bag which looked perfect for a sunny destination while pairing the look with £55  box-fresh white trainers from Italian brand Superga.

William also opted for blue, with navy chinos and powder jumper over a shirt. He added sensible brown shoes as he helped his little ones out of the car into the busy airport.

Heir to the throne Prince George looked like a mini-me of his dad in a dark blue trousers and a lighter polo shirt. He added camouflage bag.

FEMAIL has contacted Kensington Palace. 

The Windsor Suite at Heathrow costs £3,300 for up to three people for an arriving or departing flight, as well as those on flights connecting within three hours.

In the photos the royal parents can be seen unloading the car whilst Prince George waits patiently on the kerb. The photos were taken at 4pm on October 21.

Always one to travel in style, Kate sported a blue length midi dress with a pretty check pattern and white trainers. Proving her style chops she added a matching mask as she a carried a straw bag which looked perfect for a sunny destination.

It’s previously been used by Meghan Markle’s mother Doria Ragland, as well as popes and presidents.  

The trip comes as Buckingham Palace was accused yesterday of misleading the nation over the state of the Queen’s health.

The illustrious Windsor Suite where popes, presidents and even Vladimir Putin has been wined and dined in luxury at Heathrow Airport… but will set you back £3,300 

For travellers weary from the hustle and bustle of flying economy, the idea of flying first-class alone may seem like a distant dream.

But for the elite few an ultra-luxurious experience awaits them when they touch down in London.

Aptly dubbed the Windsor Suite, the opulent VIP service and private lounge at Heathrow Airport  has welcomed popes, presidents, royalty and religious leaders into a lap of luxury.

‘If you’re supposed to be here, you won’t need directions,’ said Anita Newcourt referring to the deliberate lack of signage, the lounge’s manager told the Financial Times in 2011.

‘We want to stay the airport’s best-kept secret.’

Adorned with sculptures, bonsai trees and white leather sofas, the Windsor Suite could not seem further away from the madness of the average airport waiting area.

Before 2011 the suite was reserved for a select few whose names were on a list maintained by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, meaning no amount of money of game could grant even the most A-list celebrity access.

Now, it has opened its doors to the wealthy – and the prices are eye-watering to say the least.

The Windsor Suite’s ‘Black’ service starts at £2,750 plus VAT (£3,300) for up to three people for an arriving flight as well as those on flights connecting within three hours.

According to the official brochure, wealthy travellers arriving at the airport can expect:

  • Staff to meet you from your aircraft, either on the air-bridge or at the foot of the aircraft steps
  • Staff to take your baggage tags and drive you to your VIP suite by private luxury chauffeur-driven car while a baggage team arranges the collection of your bags.
  • To be shown to your own private lounge where you can relax with refreshments
  • To have your passport and other documents handed to immigration officials. You are present but do not need to take an active part unless they require more information or additional checks
  • To be able to leave the airport and continue your journey after the formalities of customs and immigration are oever
  • To have your chauffeur vehicle take you to any address in the UK (applicable for Black service)

Heathrow VIP’s website says: ‘Heathrow VIP provides you with the perfect airport experience.

‘A private and personal service like no other, we offer a luxurious and exclusive transition through Heathrow.

‘We understand every journey is unique, and our team is committed to ensuring your experience is seamless and memorable.’

It adds that while paparazzi are not allowed in the secure area of the suites: ‘We cannot guarantee long distance photographs will not be taken.

‘Should we be aware of Paparazzi at the Airport or surrounding areas, the Airport team will request they cease and move on.’

William was last with his grandmother and father, Prince Charles, at Windsor Castle on Tuesday for a lavish reception following the  a Government investment summit.

Commentators including BBC royal correspondent Nicholas Witchell questioned whether the palace had undermined public trust by failing to reveal she had been taken to hospital. 

The 95-year-old monarch was admitted to King Edward VII’s on Wednesday afternoon and stayed there overnight for tests.

A two-day scheduled visit to Northern Ireland had to be cancelled at the last minute.

The palace’s communications team told journalists the Queen had remained at Windsor Castle.

However on Thursday night – more than 24 hours later – it confirmed she had been taken to the private hospital in London.

Unusually, the royal standard remained flying at Windsor on Wednesday, even after the Queen had left. 

The flag represents the sovereign and is flown only when she is present.

A royal source denied it was kept aloft as part of a cover-up and said the standard did not move to every building she visited. 

The source said Windsor had remained the Queen’s residence, despite the overnight trip. Mr Witchell insisted journalists – and the public – ‘weren’t given the complete picture’. 

He added: ‘The problem, it seems to me, is that rumour and misinformation always thrive in the absence of proper, accurate and trustworthy information.’

Peter Hunt, a royal commentator and former BBC journalist, claimed there had been a ‘failed attempt’ to cover up the hospital admission. 

He said: ‘The media’s faith in the veracity of royal communications will have been sorely tested by the failed attempt to hide the fact the Queen spent a night in hospital. Buckingham Palace can ill afford a breakdown in trust, given all they’re dealing with.’

Palace officials are generally reluctant to disclose information relating to health matters because the Royal Family is entitled to privacy and medical confidentiality.

But updates are usually provided if a senior royal is admitted to hospital, and the health of the monarch is of constitutional significance. As head of state, the Queen’s health has been subject to intense scrutiny, which increases as she gets older.

The revelation that she had needed to be seen by specialists in hospital – her first overnight stay for eight years – has fuelled public concern about her health.

Mr Witchell told BBC Breakfast: ‘We are told that she’s back at Windsor Castle, undertaking light duties. Well, we must hope that we can place reliance on what the palace is telling us.’ Royal expert and biographer Ingrid Seward said: ‘They did mislead the media. I think they were trying to protect the Queen, because she would not have wanted a fuss, but it was misleading.’

Joe Little, managing editor of Majesty magazine, added: ‘The Queen does have a right to a certain degree of privacy, but on the other hand she’s head of state.

‘So does that entitle us to know exactly what ailments she may or may not have? It’s a very difficult one to get the balance right for the satisfaction of everybody.’

The Queen was discharged from hospital on Thursday and is now expected to remain in Windsor, where doctors have told her to rest. Buckingham Palace has not disclosed the nature of the tests carried out at King Edward VII’s and it is not known whether she will need any further examination or treatment.

She was taken from Windsor to hospital by car rather than by helicopter, and was expected to stay for a short period while she was seen by specialists. The decision to admit her overnight was taken for ‘practical reasons’, a source said.

A royal spokesman said on Thursday night : ‘Following medical advice to rest for a few days, the Queen attended hospital on Wednesday afternoon for some preliminary investigations, returning to Windsor at lunchtime [on Thursday], and remains in good spirits.’

The day before there was no mention of hospital. A senior royal aide argued that the monarch was entitled to privacy on medical issues and the palace had never given a ‘running commentary’ on her health. They maintained that tests and preliminary investigations should be kept private.

And they said that had she gone in for a more serious reason the public would probably have been told. However in 2018 the Queen secretly had surgery to remove a cataract.

William and Kate’s getaway comes after they held a star-studded event at Alexandra Palace in London to celebrate The Duke of Cambridge’s Earthshot Prize.  

William was last with his grandmother and father, Prince Charles, at Windsor Castle on Tuesday for a lavish reception following the a Government investment summit

The decade-long global environmental competition awards £1million to five winners for an idea to protect the planet.  

William’s Earthshot Prize takes its inspiration from the Apollo moon landings, nicknamed Moonshot, which helped advance mankind’s technological achievements.

It features five categories, or Earthshots – Protect and restore nature; Clean our air, Revive our oceans; Build a waste-free world; and Fix our climate – which organisers say, if achieved by 2030, would improve life for all. 

Every year from 2021 until the end of the decade, winners of the five Earthshots – protect and restore nature; clean our air; revive our oceans; build a waste-free world; and fix our climate – will each receive £1 million to be used for their ideas.

Fifteen finalists were announced earlier this month, including a teenager from India who has designed a solar-powered ironing cart and the nation of Costa Rica, which has pioneered a project paying local citizens to restore natural ecosystems. 

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