TalkTalk to hike prices by up to £30 for millions of customers as cost of living soars

TalkTalk to hike prices by up to £30 for millions of customers as cost of living soars

TALKTALK is set to hike prices by up to £30 for millions of broadband customers this year.

The 9.1% increase will be added to bills from April, amounting to around £2 extra each month.

The cost of living has soared, with energy bills and food prices rising and tax increases planned for April.

Inflation, which measures the rising cost of consumer goods, jumped to the highest level in 30 years this month.

TalkTalk sets its prices by the January inflation rate – which rocketed to 5.4%, as announced yesterday – plus an additional 3.7%.

This is slightly less than the increase planned by competitors including BT, EE and Vodafone, which add an extra 3.9% to the inflation rate.

For example, the firm's Fibre 64 package is £24 but will cost an extra £2.20 a month from April, amounting to a £26.40 annual rise.

Customers who've added TalkTalk TV to the same broadband deal currently pay £28 a month.

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That's set to rise to £30.50 from April – a £2.50 monthly increase adding up to £30 over the course of a year.

Millions of customers are expected to be affected by the jump, but last year two groups were exempt from price rises.

That included consumers that the provider deemed as vulnerable and those who signed up between November 10 2020 and February 28 2021.

It's not clear what exemptions, if any, will apply this year but we will update this story with the details when we know more.

TalkTalk hasn't confirmed these figures, but the company's prices do rise each year.

For example, last year TalkTalk added up to £36 a year to customers' bills.

The Sun has contacted TalkTalk for comment.

The average EE or BT customer will see their bills rise by £3.50 a month, or £42 a year.

Meanwhile, most Brits using Vodafone will end up paying around £2.88 extra each month, an annual rise of £34.50.

How can I save money on my broadband bills?

If you're a TalkTalk customer and you're worried about your bills going up in April, there are steps you can take.

Don't ignore the problem and get in touch with the company about your concerns – they might be able to help.

For example, they might offer you a payment extension to give you more time to settle your monthly bill.

One Virgin Media customer saved almost £700 on their TV and broadband package just by asking the company.

Price rises could prompt you to consider switching to a cheaper company, but make sure you check your contract first.

Some companies include the annual CPI rise in the initial agreement, in which case you'd be charged for leaving early.

TalkTalk hasn't confirmed whether customers will be charged fees if they want to leave.

If you do decide to switch, comparison websites such as Compare The Market and Moneysupermarket can help you to find cheap deals.

Families on benefits such as Universal Credit are often able to get cheaper broadband packages.

Several companies provide special discounted rates for customers who are on Universal Credit or other benefits.

TalkTalk has teamed up with the Department for Work and Pensions to offer six months worth of free broadband to jobseekers.

Jobcentre staff will hand out the vouchers, so contact your work coach to see if you're eligible.

BT offers a basic £15 a month phone and broadband package for households that claim certain benefits – this deal isn't affected by price increases this year.

Virgin Media also has a cheaper deal for people on Universal Credit.

The £15 a month Virgin Essentials offer is only available to existing customers – but it could be a good option if you’re already signed up and are looking to reduce your costs.

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