SARAH VINE: War on mothers is feminism's biggest fight for decades

SARAH VINE: War on mothers is feminism's biggest fight for decades

SARAH VINE: This war on mothers is feminism’s biggest fight for decades

Mum, mother, mummy. I am proud to call myself all these things. In common with countless women throughout the ages, being a mother is a fundamental, undeniable and indelible part of my identity as a woman.

But the powerful and hugely influential gay rights organisation Stonewall thinks such a fundamental belief is wrong. Not only wrong, but also discriminatory and very possibly wicked.

It asserts I must not call myself mother, nor be called one. Instead, I must re-educate my brain to think of myself as ‘a parent who has given birth’. Not to do so is an affront to trans people, an attack on their right to gender self-identification.

And we can’t have that. No, far better to cancel a vast swathe of the population – that is to say mothers – so a small number of biological males who wish to define themselves as female (not something, by the way, that I have any issue with), can feel better about themselves.

Mum, mother, mummy. I am proud to call myself all these things. In common with countless women throughout the ages, being a mother is a fundamental, undeniable and indelible part of my identity as a woman (file photo)

Think I’m exaggerating? If only I were. Previously, the Welsh government deleted the term ‘mother’ from its maternity policy.

Following Joe Biden’s election as US President, the word ‘mother’ was removed from the rules of the House of Representatives, along with other overtly ‘gendered’ terminology.

Meanwhile, ‘breast-feeding’ has become ‘chest-feeding’, it’s not ‘mother’s milk’ but ‘chest-milk’ and maternity departments don’t call themselves such because motherhood is deemed an out-dated social construct. And where the existence of biological sex is, to some such as Stonewall’s CEO Nancy Kelley, the equivalent of antisemitism.

That’s right: if you think that, as a woman, you have the exclusive right to be referred to as one, you are on a par with one of the greatest war criminals the world has ever seen.

There is, of course, an undeniable irony in the notion of an organisation which fought so hard for so long against the persecution of one group of people – gay men – now participating in the hounding of another: women.

Meanwhile, ‘breast-feeding’ has become ‘chest-feeding’, it’s not ‘mother’s milk’ but ‘chest-milk’ and maternity departments don’t call themselves such because motherhood is deemed an out-dated social construct. And where the existence of biological sex is, to some such as Stonewall’s CEO Nancy Kelley (pictured), the equivalent of antisemitism

No doubt that is why some of its more prominent supporters have voiced serious concerns about the direction it’s going.

But the awful truth is, when it comes to Stonewall’s mission to eradicate biological sex, much of the damage is already done.

Over the past few years, it has slowly but surely infiltrated countless government organisations, pushing its agenda and rewiring society from within.

Thanks to Stonewall’s ‘diversity champions scheme’, which 250 government agencies subscribe to and which pulls in millions each year for the organisation, there is a generation of young civil servants and policy-makers who believe this stuff.

The Home Office, MI6, the Department for International Trade and the House of Commons are all in the top 100 on Stonewall’s Workplace Equality Index, meaning they’re signed up to an agenda which not only openly denies women their fundamental biological identity but also persecutes them if they dare to push back.

These include Baroness Falkner, the new chairwoman of the Equalities and Human Rights Commission, who has angered activists by saying women should have the right to question transgender identity without being abused, stigmatised or put at risk of losing their jobs.

They include Liz Truss, Women and Equalities Minister, currently urging all government departments and public bodies to withdraw from Stonewall’s scheme.

They include Liz Truss (pictured), Women and Equalities Minister, currently urging all government departments and public bodies to withdraw from Stonewall’s scheme

Both women have faced a barrage of abuse for daring to question the Stonewall ethos.

Vitally, this is not just an argument about semantics. It is the single most important battle feminism has faced since the hunger-striking Suffragettes had feeding tubes shoved down their throats.

Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, people of all genders and none, you have left us with no choice. This is war.

Davina sinks to a new low

Honestly, I have never watched such drivel as ITV’s Masked Dancer. Worst is the judging panel, who have as much authenticity as a fake fiver. Particularly irritating is Davina McCall, left, who says she is engaged in a ‘plunge-off’ with Amanda Holden for who wears the lowest cut dress. Stay classy, ladies!

That fearless critic of Islam, Ed Husain, claims some Muslim clerics openly practise sharia law and believe allowing women out of the house leads to ‘tragedy and misfortune’. 

Depressing evidence that a small minority live as if it were 9th Century Kabul, not 21st Century Britain.

Vegan kids come up short 

Yet more worrying findings about the effects of parents imposing veganism on their children. In a study of five to ten-year-olds, those on a vegan diet were up to an inch shorter than omnivore counterparts. 

They also had weaker bones and were more likely to be deficient in vitamin B12.

Whenever I buy anything online – even a pint of milk – I am sent an infuriating follow-up ‘how did we do’ survey request. Don’t these firms realise that if I’m unhappy, I’d contact them pronto anyway? Except you can’t get through by phone. They’re too busy sending out stupid surveys. 

Surely the reason middle-aged women are most likely to suffer ‘long Covid’ is less down to their age and sex and more due to them not taking enough time off to recover, and continuing with family chores – unlike men who generally make champion convalescents. 

Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai is a remarkable young woman. Yet there’s something uncomfortable about such a potent symbol of feminism and freedom appearing this month on the cover of Vogue magazine, which celebrities use as a vehicle for their own vanity. 

When asked about the whole Harry and Meghan debacle, Prince Edward and his wife Sophie simply joked: ‘Oprah who?’ and ‘What interview?’ Perhaps the sanest response to date. 

Naomi’s missing the point 

Few have the unshakable self-belief of a Jose Mourinho so I have some sympathy for tennis player Naomi Osaka who finds media interviews unsettling. 

That said, it’s worrying how celebrities use mental illness as a way of blocking criticism of their behaviour. 

Yes, we all feel anxious at times and reluctant to discuss issues. But that’s not being mentally ill. It’s just life. 

Youngsters who choose an apprenticeship over a college are earning up to £7,000 a year more than those with degrees. That’s no surprise considering universities’ obsession with indoctrination and wokery. 

If it were a choice between that and actually learning something, I know which I’d pick.

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