Prince Philip dies: Lady Louise goes carriage driving in tribute

Prince Philip dies: Lady Louise goes carriage driving in tribute

Lady Louise Windsor pays tribute to her grandfather Prince Philip by taking his ponies carriage driving on the morning of his death – after following him into the sport that he loved so much

  • Lady Louise Windsor, 17, went carriage driving in the grounds of Windsor Castle early this morning 
  • The hobby is one she shared with her grandfather, the Duke of Edinburgh, who died this morning 
  • Duke of Edinburgh was instrumental in helping to establish carriage driving as a sport in Britain

Lady Louise Windsor paid a touching tribute to her grandfather Prince Philip today as she was spotted out carriage driving in the grounds of Windsor Castle on the morning of his death.

Prince Edward and Sophie the Countess of Wessex’s daughter, 17, could be seen participating in the hobby that she shared with her grandfather the Duke of Edinburgh, who was instrumental in helping to establish carriage driving as a sport in Britain. 

The teenager, who was joined by an aide and wore her blonde hair in a low ponytail, cut a casual figure in black and wrapped up warm in black trousers and a coat – putting safety first in a protective helmet.

Her appearance came just hours before the Queen today announced with ‘deep sorrow’ the death of her husband at the age of 99, her ‘strength and guide’ throughout their 73-year marriage and her 69-year reign.   

Lady Louise Windsor (pictured), 17, paid a touching tribute to her grandfather Prince Philip today as she was spotted out carriage driving in the grounds of Windsor Castle on the morning of his death

Prince Philip has previously spoken about how he took up carriage driving when he stopped playing polo at the age of 50. Pictured, for a morning drive on his carriage in Norfolk after he handed his driving license back after his accident in February

Her Majesty announced her husband’s death at midday as the Union Flag was lowered to half-mast outside Buckingham Palace and on public buildings across the UK and Commonwealth.

The Royal Family said in a statement: ‘It is with deep sorrow that Her Majesty The Queen announces the death of her beloved husband, His Royal Highness The Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

‘His Royal Highness passed away peacefully this morning at Windsor Castle. Further announcements will made in due course. The Royal Family join with people around the world in mourning his loss’. 

Lady Louise and her mother Sophie Wessex, who are both avid carriage drivers, competed in the Champagne Laurent-Perrier Meet of the British Driving Society in Berkshire in May last year. 

Lady Louise, 17, who was joined by an aide (pictured), could be seen participating in the hobby that she shared with her grandfather the Duke of Edinburgh, who was instrumental in helping to establish carriage driving as a sport in Britain

Lady Louise (pictured, this morning) was taught at a young age, and has inherited a love of carriage driving from her grandfather, Prince Philip, who has represented Britain in three European championships and six world championships

Lady Louise Windsor (pictured), who wore her blonde hair in a low ponytail, wrapped up warm in black trousers and a coat – and put safety first in a protective helmet

Lady Louise Windsor’s appearance came just hours before the Queen today announced with ‘deep sorrow’ the death of her husband at the age of 99, her ‘strength and guide’ throughout their 73-year marriage and her 69-year reign.

Her Majesty announced Prince Philip’s death at midday as the Union Flag was lowered to half-mast outside Buckingham Palace and on public buildings across the UK and Commonwealth. Pictured, Lady Louise Windsor this morning

Lady Louise was taught at a young age, and has inherited a love of carriage driving from her grandfather, Prince Philip.

Following his retirement, Philip had more time to enjoy carriage-driving, which was one of his favourite past-times since the 1970s.

He raced carriages near Norfolk before going on to represent Britain at several world and European championships.

REINING PASSION: PRINCE PHILIP AND CARRIAGE DRIVING

Prince Philip, 95, turned to carriage racing after he decided to stop playing polo at the age of 50.

The Duke of Edinburgh practised racing carriages in Norfolk before pulling together a committee to decide on official rules for a sport.

He went on to represent Great Britain, taking part in several European and World Championships, as well as competitions in Hungary, Poland and the Netherlands. 

Prince Philip drives the Queen’s Team of part-bred Cleveland Bays at Home Park Windsor in 1974


Prince Philip competing in the 2006 Hopetoun Estate horse driving trials (left). He stopped at the pub for a pint whilst competing at Cirencester Park in 1975 (right)

The sport involves either two or four-wheeled carriages pulled by a single horse, a tandem or four-in-hand team.

Different contests include dressage, time trials and a challenging obstacle course. 

Carriage driving can also be simply a relaxed way of enjoying the countryside. 

In May 2017, Prince Philip spoke about how he took up carriage driving when he stopped playing polo at the age of 50. 

He said: ‘I was looking round to see what next, I didn’t know what there was available. And I suddenly thought, well, we’ve got horses and carriages so why don’t I have a go.

‘So I borrowed four horses from the stables in London, took them to Norfolk and practised and thought – why not?’

The Duke described how he convened a committee of equestrian experts to come up with a set of international rules for the fledgling sport of carriage driving. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, joined by two aides, during the Royal Windsor Horse Show in Windsor, Berkshire on May 9, 2019

The Duke of Edinburgh pictured out for a carriage drive on the grounds of Windsor Castle on 22 April 2019 

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