Man’s premature ejaculation ‘cured’ after docs zap his penis with electrical current

Man’s premature ejaculation ‘cured’ after docs zap his penis with electrical current

PREMATURE ejaculation can be distressing for those who suffer with it and their sexual partners.

But scientists may have discovered a way to cure the ailment through the use of electrical currents.


Premature ejaculation, or erectile dysfunction impacts millions of men worldwide and it is very common.

Common treatment options include behavioural techniques, topical anaesthetics, counselling or medication.

A doctor may order blood tests to check the levels of testosterone, and you may be referred to a urologist or sexual dysfunction specialist.

But this new treatment could be an alternative option and involves electrodes being stuck onto the penis for 30 minutes, for three sessions a week.

Read more on men’s sexual health

Man nearly loses his penis after tourniquet syndrome cuts off circulation

We took Viagra wanting great sex but ended up with broken penises & amputations

Writing in the Asian Journal or Urology experts revealed that one man who underwent the therapy was able to last seven times longer in bed than before.

The 28-year-old man was treated in Lebanon for six months after trying different drugs to help with his condition.

The experts said the man had been in a relationship with his girlfriend for a year and would usually ejaculate after 40 seconds.

After the course of treatment he was able to have intercourse for five minutes before climaxing.

Most read in Health

BUG BEAR

Covid restrictions update as Boris keeps data 'under review' after cases spike

HIGH ALERT

Warning to parents over new Covid complication that affects kids over 5

BRAIN BUSTER

Warning to anyone who’s had Covid over ‘irreversible’ damage to the brain

BUG BEAR

NHS chiefs call for return of masks & limit indoor mixing after cases hit new high

As part of the treatment, a nerve stimulator machine is used, which is then attached to the penis shaft.

One surface electrode is placed on the base of the shaft, with the other 2cm up.

The machine disrupts the nerve response that is needed for muscles to contract – which would result in ejaculation

Over the course of the treatment period the man was exposed to electrical currents .

Before the treatment course he had to measure the time from vaginal penetration to ejaculation – which was 40 seconds.

By the end of the treatment plan this was around three minutes and 54 seconds.

Once he stopped using the device, it continued to improve his sex life.

Fourteen months after the treatment it was taking him five minutes and 14 seconds to reach climax – which the NHS says is the average time.

How can you treat premature ejaculation?

There are a number of things you can do before seeking professional help.

According to the NHS, it can sometimes help to:

  • masturbate an hour or two before having sex
  • use a thick condom to help decrease sensation
  • take a deep breath to briefly shut down the ejaculatory reflex (an automatic reflex of the body during which ejaculation occurs)
  • have sex with your partner on top (to allow them to pull away when you are close to ejaculating)
  • take breaks during sex and think about something boring

Medics did not state that the treatment was painless, but said they can be used 'without discomfort'.

However, they did explain that it is not yet 'fully understood' why these electro currents help with premature ejaculation.

They stated that they believe stimulating the dorsal nerve interferes with the muscles that contract when a man is about to ejaculate.

They added that more studies need to be done to determine whether or not this therapy can be used as a drug-free treatment for those experiencing premature ejaculation.

According to the NHS, a number of psychological and physical factors can cause premature ejaculation.

Read More on The Sun

Brooklyn and Nicola ride in £500k Jag as first official wedding pics emerge

Huge queues as eco-mobs ‘leave one in three garages in South’ out of fuel

Physical reasons include prostate problems, thyroid problems and recreational drugs.

Meanwhile psychological problems include depression, stress, relationship problems or anxiety about sexual performance.

We pay for your stories!

Do you have a story for The Sun news desk?

Email us at [email protected] or call 0207 782 4104. You can WhatsApp us on 07423 720 250. We pay for videos too. Click here to upload yours

Click here to get The Sun newspaper delivered for FREE for the next six weeks.

    Source: Read Full Article