Billy Murrays bitter row with co-star Chevy Chase left pair in brutal fight

Billy Murrays bitter row with co-star Chevy Chase left pair in brutal fight

Jeep: Bill Murray relives ‘Groundhog Day’ in advert

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Among Hollywood’s most loved stars, Bill Murray’s turn in the 1993 comedy fantasy flick Groundhog Day airs from 12.50pm on ITV4 today. Murray, now 71, plays Phil Connors, a brash weatherman, who has been sent to cover the yearly Groundhog Day festival in Pennsylvania. After a freak snowstorm leaves Connors stranded, a weather forecast he failed to predict, he wakes up the next day to find time hasn’t moved on and it’s still the same day.

The film was a huge success with critics, including reviews aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, which said it achieved 97 percent positive reviews from critics.

At the time of its release, author William Goldman said that he felt Groundhog Day is the one that will be—of all of the movies that came out this year, it’s the one that will be remembered in 10 years”.

By 2006, the film had been selected by the United States Library of Congress to be preserved in the National Film Registry for being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Murray’s version of Connors was typical of the star’s blunt, and often overly angry characters, which also included the likes of the lead in Scrooged.

And it appears away from the camera Murray’s temper with colleagues and co-stars was just as notorious.

This included one spat with legendary actor Chevy Chase, a friend and co-star of Murray’s colleague of Dan Aykroyd, who starred opposite him in 1984’s Ghostbuster.

Aykroyd, himself a huge box office star during the Eighties, noted Murray’s mood swings became so legendary, he called his friend “The Murricane”.

Murray previously said of his reputation: “I remember a friend said to me a while back: ‘You have a reputation.’ And I said: ‘What?’

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“And he said: ‘Yeah, you have a reputation of being difficult to work with.’

“But I only got that reputation from people I didn’t like working with, or people who didn’t know how to work, or what work is.

“Jim, Wes and Sofia, they know what it is to work, and they understand how you’re supposed to treat people.”

His temper, however, did lead to a huge falling out with Chase, who recalled the feud in 2015’s book, Live from New York: An Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live, as Told By Its Stars, Writers and Guests.

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He reported how Murray approached him prior to a Saturday Night Live (SNL) broadcast in 1978, which Chase had been invited to guest host again.

The pair rowed over Chase wishing to do the “Weekend Update” segment of the show, which had been taken over by Jane Curtin.

This disagreement saw Chase and Murray get so incensed with each other, and the former saying of his sparring partner that his face looked “like something Neil Armstrong had landed on”.

Soon, the argument became physical, and a number of SNL cast members, including Curtin, Laraine Newman and Gilda Radner, watching nervously on.

Murray would later say of the incident: “It was an Oedipal thing, a rupture.

“Because we all felt mad he had left us, and somehow I was the anointed avenging angel, who had to speak for everyone.

“But Chevy and I are friends now. It’s all fine.”

Even on Groundhog Day itself, Murray’s feuding rose its head, with longtime collaborator, and the film’s director, Harold Ramis next in the firing line.

Screenwriter Danny Rubin recalled: “They were like two brothers who weren’t getting along.”

Groundhog Day airs from 12.50pm on ITV4 today.

Murray would later say of the incident: “It was an Oedipal thing, a rupture.

“Because we all felt mad he had left us, and somehow I was the anointed avenging angel, who had to speak for everyone.

“But Chevy and I are friends now. It’s all fine.”

Even on Groundhog Day itself, Murray’s feuding rose its head, with longtime collaborator, and the film’s director, Harold Ramis next in the firing line.

Screenwriter Danny Rubin recalled: “They were like two brothers who weren’t getting along.”

Groundhog Day airs from 12.50pm on ITV4 today.

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